Eydie’s Office – Email Marketing and Social Media Support

The Unforeseen Consequences of the Social Web

Posted on: February 1, 2009

As usual, I was in Facebook when one of my ‘Friends’ posted a link. The article title was, “The Unforeseen Consequences of the Social Web.”  This subject was something I had recently discussed with a colleague of mine and was curious to read what others have to say.

We need to be cautious as to what you post on any internet site. Whether it be on your blog, a Facebook or Twitter comment, and even the photographs we upload. One image showing you partying with a glass of beer in your hand could determine whether or not you get the interview at that prestigious company you had been working so hard to get into.

Read the article below and post your comments…

The social Web has given users great power: the ability to create and share content with people around the world – easily and quickly. The problem of course, is that power is often not compatible with effective and clear thinking. The thought that germinated in an instant can be immortalized in perpetuity on the Web.

With the extraordinary growth of the Internet and the interlinking of information that the social Web has brought with it, it’s time to examine the footprints we leave on the Web as we move into the future that promises to “throttle the ‘wisdom of the crowds’ from turning into the ‘madness of the mobs,'” as described so eloquently by Jason Calacanis.

Search Engines Are No Longer Enough

With Internet usage growing at a remarkable pace it comes as no surprise that comScore recently rated Google as the most popular Internet property in the world, attracting over 777.9 million visitors as of December 2008. Not surprising either is the growth of social and news sites. According to Compete some of the top social sites attracted visitors in the millions during December 2008:

·         FaceBook: 59 million visitors

·         MySpace: 59 million visitors

·         Digg: 33 million visitors

·         Twitter: 4.4 million visitors

This growth can be contributed in part to the media as they realize the benefits of instant access to an enormous well of information that the Web provides. As media folk are becoming increasingly tech savvy, they’re realizing results from search engines are often lacking. In an effort to gain as much insight into specific topics they are now turning to social sites for research.

Interconnected on the Web

While it’s exciting to live in an ever connected and always on world, the flip side that we have to accept is that we also live in a world where information is becoming increasingly interlinked. Today it is relatively simple to follow footprints on the Web if we want to track both people and brands.

For instance, take a look at my public profile on Twitter and you’ll notice I can also be found on other sites: BlogWell, ReadWriteWeb and The Drill Down. Visit BlogWell and you’ll notice I can be found at WebMama and TechTalkRadio. Visit The Drill Down and you’ll see my contact information for Digg. While I occasionally use different user names on sites, I publicly declare my affiliations and unless you know me really well, or have reason to follow me across the Web, you may not realize the relationships I have or where I can be found online by visiting any one site.

While the information about me on the Web is not terribly exciting, I do leave a little bit of information on every site I visit. And therein lies the rub. Say something in passing on a social site and it may come back to haunt you. Written by Lidija Davis / January 25, 2009 Read the entire article 

 

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