Eydie’s Office – Email Marketing and Social Media Support

Archive for the ‘Internet’ Category

Recently, my clients have been asking me about Facebook, Twitter and blogging. They haven’t yet taken the leap into this new, exciting….and sometimes intimidating landscape and they are not sure where to begin – or even SHOULD they begin.

“Why should I be on Facebook or Twitter?”, they ask?

Let me begin by saying that Social Media Networking is NOT for everyone nor is it for every industry! Anyone who is considering entering into the Social Media arena should make sure that it is a good fit for them and their industry. I’ve had concerns from people who are attornerys, and in the insurance & financial industry who have expressed an issue with posting anything online.  I’m sure that there are many bloggers and Facebook fans who are lawyers and financial planners and insurance brokers who are active Social Media users, but the key thing to do is to verify whether or not your industry frowns on it or not….then it’s a matter of YOUR comfort level and the reasons WHY you want to become involved!

So, here we go. Social Media is very simply any  TOOL or SITE which allows INTERACTION with its users!  If you can comment on a site, interact and engage in conversation with others, or even re-arrange the design of the site, well, then that’s Social Media!

Networking is users TAKING those tools to make CONNECTIONS with people how have similar interests and then BUILDING RELATIONSHIPS with them.  While building relationships with people not only around the country, but around the world, you are helping to teach others about WHO you are and WHAT you do!

I suggest that you take TWO first steps! 

  • Create a blog. Through blogging articles, uploading pictures of yourself and your products, and adding videos, you are letting people know that YOU are the EXPERT in your field. Your content should be educational, engaging and entertaining. Teach others what you NOW (not always about the products and services you offer) and get them to respond back to you. If you can do this and be entertaining all at the same time then that’s even better.
  • Sign up for a Facebook account: If you are on only one networking site then let it be Facebook!  It allows you to not only add your current “real world” friends, but it gives you the greatest opportunity of all – meeting people from all over the world!  Your potential clients don’t necessarily have to be in your own geographical community – they can be anywhere!

Whether Blogging or on Facebook you are making connections.  While you are building relationships people are getting to KNOW, LIKE and TRUT you!  And just like in “real world” networking, people do business with people they KNOW, LIKE and TRUST! Social Media is just another avenue for you to use to get yourself in front of other people!

Did you know that in 2007 only 24% percent of the American population was getting their news from the Internet?  Well, in 2008 it skyrocketed to over 40%!  WOW… I think that’s a pretty sure sign that, as business owners, we MUST begin to think about using Social Media resources and ADD them into our current marketing campaigns.

Oh and don’t forget some pretty important people…….. YOUR COMPETITION! Whether or not you decide to jump in and and begin blogging and updating on Facebook…… your competition IS!!  Not only is Social Media a good way to get your name out in the world, but you can watch what your competition is doing as well!  AND what do they say?? “KNOW YOUR COMPETITION”!!!

BOOST Your Business with Social Media!

BOOST Your Business with Social Media!

I could go on an on…and I probably already have so I’ll stop right here!  Read more  in my ebook, BOOST Your Business with Social Media, Your 2009 Social Media Guide for SuccessAlso, register for my teleseminar on February 27, 2009 at 10:00am. If you are a novice or haven’t given Social Media a shot yet, then register for this one hour teleseminar!

 

Success in 2009!  Eydie 🙂

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As usual, I was in Facebook when one of my ‘Friends’ posted a link. The article title was, “The Unforeseen Consequences of the Social Web.”  This subject was something I had recently discussed with a colleague of mine and was curious to read what others have to say.

We need to be cautious as to what you post on any internet site. Whether it be on your blog, a Facebook or Twitter comment, and even the photographs we upload. One image showing you partying with a glass of beer in your hand could determine whether or not you get the interview at that prestigious company you had been working so hard to get into.

Read the article below and post your comments…

The social Web has given users great power: the ability to create and share content with people around the world – easily and quickly. The problem of course, is that power is often not compatible with effective and clear thinking. The thought that germinated in an instant can be immortalized in perpetuity on the Web.

With the extraordinary growth of the Internet and the interlinking of information that the social Web has brought with it, it’s time to examine the footprints we leave on the Web as we move into the future that promises to “throttle the ‘wisdom of the crowds’ from turning into the ‘madness of the mobs,'” as described so eloquently by Jason Calacanis.

Search Engines Are No Longer Enough

With Internet usage growing at a remarkable pace it comes as no surprise that comScore recently rated Google as the most popular Internet property in the world, attracting over 777.9 million visitors as of December 2008. Not surprising either is the growth of social and news sites. According to Compete some of the top social sites attracted visitors in the millions during December 2008:

·         FaceBook: 59 million visitors

·         MySpace: 59 million visitors

·         Digg: 33 million visitors

·         Twitter: 4.4 million visitors

This growth can be contributed in part to the media as they realize the benefits of instant access to an enormous well of information that the Web provides. As media folk are becoming increasingly tech savvy, they’re realizing results from search engines are often lacking. In an effort to gain as much insight into specific topics they are now turning to social sites for research.

Interconnected on the Web

While it’s exciting to live in an ever connected and always on world, the flip side that we have to accept is that we also live in a world where information is becoming increasingly interlinked. Today it is relatively simple to follow footprints on the Web if we want to track both people and brands.

For instance, take a look at my public profile on Twitter and you’ll notice I can also be found on other sites: BlogWell, ReadWriteWeb and The Drill Down. Visit BlogWell and you’ll notice I can be found at WebMama and TechTalkRadio. Visit The Drill Down and you’ll see my contact information for Digg. While I occasionally use different user names on sites, I publicly declare my affiliations and unless you know me really well, or have reason to follow me across the Web, you may not realize the relationships I have or where I can be found online by visiting any one site.

While the information about me on the Web is not terribly exciting, I do leave a little bit of information on every site I visit. And therein lies the rub. Say something in passing on a social site and it may come back to haunt you. Written by Lidija Davis / January 25, 2009 Read the entire article 

 

Creating strong passwords is important to secure your personal and financial property. But what makes a strong password? 

 

To ensure you have a password which can protect your high and medium security sites, make it lengthy.  Eight or more characters are suggested. With each character you add you create a stronger barrier around your sensitive materials.

 

Mix your password with lower case and upper case letters along with numbers.  Some sites now allow you to use the space bar and other characters such as the # or $ sign as well as the underscore key.

 

In addition, don’t use your name, birth date or other personal information as your password. Even spelling your name backwards can be easy to crack.  Try to use different passwords, don’t use just one or two. Changing your passwords from time to time helps to keep hackers at bay!

 

Lastly, don’t reveal your passwords to anyone and if you have to write them down, keep them in a central, yet safe location where kids, co-workers and others can’t access them. Never provide your password to unknowns over the internet and never use your password on a public computer such as at the library, internet café, computer labs or other shared computer systems. Keystroke logging devices are inexpensively purchased by hackers and allow them to gather log-in information from shared systems.

 

To learn if your passwords are secure, use the Password Checker. http://www.microsoft.com/protect/yourself/password/create.mspx

Password Checker is a “non-recording” feature which Microsoft offers to help determine your password’s strength as you type”.


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